According to a study conducted by CNI, 2,796 projects are stagnant in Brazil. Felipe Montoro Jens, Infrastructure sector expert, 517 (18.5%) of those projects are in the infrastructure sector and are worth R$10.7 billion.

In the infrastructure sector, basic sanitation programs were the most affected. According to the research, 447 enterprises were interrupted in the implementation stage.

It is claimed that less resources have been channeled to the projects in the infrastructure sector. According to Felipe Montoro Jens, the public sector flawed and that is why the projects are not continuing. Additionally, they did not turn out to be beneficial to the intended beneficiaries of the projects.

Felipe Montoro Jens continued to say that the National Confederation of Industry (NCI) had foreseen the predicament, specifically, the failure of education projects to sail through to completion. This happened despite the fact that the education projects were less costly and less complex. To find more details on Montoro’s professional career, you can visit his LinkedIn handle.

The research revealed that the root cause of projects failing to sail through to completion was technical problems, abandonment of projects by contractors and companies, financial constraints as well as expropriation.

Ilana Ferreira, infrastructure expert, said that technical problems could be the root cause of the problems. She continued to question the planning and implementation of the projects and said they were done poorly.

The government had to do something about the economic crisis in Brazil and therefore cut down spending. In the process, according to Felipe Montoro Jens, that interrupted projects.

CNI went ahead to recommend measures to help awake the stagnant projects. The recommendations include: improve macro-planning, conduct efficient macro-planning, proper execution strategies, equip teams better, design more balanced contracts and strengthen internal control. The director of CNI emphasized that it is important to learn from mistakes and so should Brazil.

CNI was founded in 1938 with an aim to represent the highest body in the industry’s trade union system as well as work to defend the interests of the national industry.